1840
First World Anti-Slavery ConventionThe World’s First Anti-Slavery Convention gathers in London’s Exeter Hall

1840 | First World Anti-Slavery Convention

In 1840, the World’s First Anti-Slavery Convention gathers in London’s Exeter Hall. More than 500 delegates from both sides of the Atlantic answer the call for participation. Among those are delegate Lucretia Mott and Elisabeth Cady Stanton from the United States. After being denied active participation on the convention floor on account of their sex, they conceive of holding a women’s rights convention upon their return to America. READ MORE +

1848
First Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, NYThe first convention in Seneca Falls, NY

1848 | First Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, NY

Abolitionists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott are leading organizers of the unprecedented convention to "discuss the social, civil and religious condition and rights of Woman." For her first public speaking engagement, Elizabeth Cady Stanton reads and opens for debate her revolutionary Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions. Modeled after the Declaration of Independence, it states that "all men and women are created equal" and calls for woman's suffrage. A motion to sign the declaration is put to a vote and adopted. This marks effectively the beginning of the suffrage movement.

1850
The first National Women's Rights Convention takes place in Worcester, MAThe old Brinley Hall Building, site of the first National Women's Rights Convention

1850 | The first National Women's Rights Convention takes place in Worcester, MA

The convention of 1848 paved the way for an organized women's right movement. The first National Woman's Rights Convention, widely attended, brings together abolitionists and women's rights advocates, progressive women and men, who call for political, social and legal equality.

'51–'61
Women's Rights Conventions Held Across the NationSojourner Truth

'51–'61 | Women's Rights Conventions Held Across the Nation

For the next ten years, National Women's Rights Conventions are held. In 1851, at a women's rights convention in Akron, Ohio, Sojourner Truth delivers her powerful speech "Ain't I a Woman". Reformers and suffragists suspend the conventions for the duration of the Civil War but continue to oppose slavery.

1863
 The Woman's Loyal League is established in the Cooper Union in New York CityCooper Union in New York City

1863 | The Woman's Loyal League is established in the Cooper Union in New York City

After publication of their appeal "To the Women of the Republic", Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony create the first national women's political organization, the Woman's Loyal League. They effectively campaign for the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution to abolish slavery by petitioning nearly 400,000 signatures. Members include abolitionists Lucy Stone and Angelina Grimké Weld.

1866
Founding of the American Equal Rights Association Members of the American Equal Rights Association

1866 | Founding of the American Equal Rights Association

Following the abolition of slavery, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony form the AERA. Black and White abolitionists and suffragists, including Lucretia Mott, Frances Harper, Sojourner Truth, Lucy Stone and Frederick Douglas, join together to campaign for universal rights and suffrage for all, regardless of gender or race.

1868
Ratification of the 14th Amendment to the ConstitutionDetail of the 14th Amendment

1868 | Ratification of the 14th Amendment to the Constitution

In which it states that all individuals born or naturalized in the United States are citizens of the United States and of the State where they live. Those said individuals are also guaranteed the right to due process, life, liberty, and property.

1869
Split among the Suffragist Movement over the 15th AmendmentThe American Woman Suffrage Association

1869 | Split among the Suffragist Movement over the 15th Amendment

Split among the Suffragist Movement over the 15th Amendment proposing to grant rights and the vote to newly emancipated slaves under the 13th Amendment. The American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA), led by Lucy Stone, supports the 15th Amendment. The National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA), led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, rejects the Amendment as it denies their rights and the vote to women.

1870
Congress ratifies the 15th AmendmentDetail of the 15th Amendment

1870 | Congress ratifies the 15th Amendment

The 15th Amendment grants suffrage to African American men.

1872
Susan B. Anthony Arrested for Casting a VotePhotograph of Susan B. Anthony

1872 | Susan B. Anthony Arrested for Casting a Vote

Susan B. Anthony is arrested for casting a vote in the presidential election of Ulysses S. Grant in an act of political defiance. She argues that the 14th Amendment implicitly gives her the right.

1874
Supreme Court Rejects Argument that 14th Amendment Grants Women Right to VoteThe Old Supreme Court Chamber

1874 | Supreme Court Rejects Argument that 14th Amendment Grants Women Right to Vote

The Supreme Court rules that the 14th amendment does not grant women the right to vote and that their rights fall under the jurisdiction of each state.

1878
Woman Suffrage Amendment First Introduced in CongressDelegate receiving suffragettes

1878 | Woman Suffrage Amendment First Introduced in Congress

A Woman Suffrage Amendment is introduced for the first time to the United States Congress.

1890
Merger between two rival organizations, AWSA and NWSA, to form NAWSANational American Woman Suffrage Association in parade

1890 | Merger between two rival organizations, AWSA and NWSA, to form NAWSA

Under the leadership of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony and Alice Stone Blackwell, the newly formed National American Woman Suffrage Association campaigns strategically for ratification of a suffrage amendment state by state.

1893
Colorado First to Give Women the Right to VoteEarly billboard celebrating the right to vote in Colorado

1893 | Colorado First to Give Women the Right to Vote

Colorado becomes the first state to ratify a state amendment giving women the right to vote.

1896
Foundation of the National Association of Colored Women (NACW)The National Association of Colored Women

1896 | Foundation of the National Association of Colored Women (NACW)

Ida B. Wells Barnett, Mary Church Terrell and Harriet Tubman among other leading figures in the black women's movement gather in Washington, D.C. to form the NACW joining together more 100 women's clubs.

1908
The Equality League for Self-Supporting Women is FormedHarriot Stanton Blatch

1908 | The Equality League for Self-Supporting Women is Formed

Founded by Harriot Stanton Blatch, daughter of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, it later becomes The Women's Political Union.

1910
First Women's Parade in New York CityFirst Women's Parade in New York City

1910 | First Women's Parade in New York City

The Women's Political Union stages its first parade in New York City.

1911
The National Association Opposed to Woman SuffrageThe National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage

1911 | The National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage

The anti-suffrage organization is founded and led by Josephine Dodge in New York City. It remains active well after the passage of the 19th Amendment.

1913
The Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage is Formed 1913 program from the Woman Suffrage Procession

1913 | The Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage is Formed

The brainchild of Alice Paul and Lucy Burns, the Congressional Union will later be known as The National Woman's Party. Efforts of the CU are concentrated on obtaining a constitutional amendment. They strategically stage a suffrage parade in Washington, DC, on the eve of President Wilson's inauguration.

1916
The Congressional Union and the Woman's Party merge into the National Woman's Party (NWP) Alice Paul

1916 | The Congressional Union and the Woman's Party merge into the National Woman's Party (NWP)

Alice Paul and the members of her NWP begin to use radical tactics borrowed from the suffrage movement in England, picketing the White House and practicing other forms of civil disobedience.

1917
Alice Paul and Other Members of the National Woman's Party Jailed and Force-FedIllustration of Alice Paul being force-fed in jail

1917 | Alice Paul and Other Members of the National Woman's Party Jailed and Force-Fed

After picketing the White House, Alice Paul and other members of the National Woman's Party are arrested and jailed. In protest, they go on a hunger strike and are force-fed.

1917
Eight States Grant Women the Right to VoteVotes for Women map

1917 | Eight States Grant Women the Right to Vote

New York, North Dakota, Indiana, Nebraska, Rhode Island, Arkansas, Michigan and Ohio.

1919
The Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution Passes Both Houses of CongressDetail of 19th Amendment

1919 | The Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution Passes Both Houses of Congress

The Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution, originally drafted by Susan B. Anthony, passes both houses of Congress and is sent to the states for ratification.

1920
The Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution Signed Into Law19th Amendment signed into law

1920 | The Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution Signed Into Law

The Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote, becomes law on August 26, 1920.