Storytelling Archive: Marion Iglesias

Women Leading the Way



Marion Iglesias

Marion Iglesias

Lycée Français de New York | New York, NY

I embraced the suffragists project totally. I knew having a meaningful topic to work on would motivate our 5th grade students. When students searched for the first woman allowed to vote in their family, we realized that, with the Lycée’s international community, some of those women were still alive and that the right to vote was only recently acquired in some countries. The project allowed students to talk about rights and women’s roles in some of their original countries. Knowing their work was to be exhibited gave them the motivation to work hard on reviewing and rewriting their essays, both in French and in English.

Working collaboratively with the entire grade and having a common aim for all fifth grade classes was uplifting as well. Sure, the whole process of researching, writing, rewriting and editing was laborious. But, the end result was so satisfying that no matter the grade or the school, I try to renew the experience every year!

SAMUEL | 5th Grade

 JANE ADDAMS  /  GEORGETTE

Georgette was a serious school child, by the way, her parents wanted that she would have good grades and she would behave well in class. VIEW PDF +

SARAH | 5th Grade

 ROSE SCOTT  /  SARAH

Sarah was my great-grandmother on my mother’s side. She was also the first woman to vote in our family, I was named after her. She was born in the United States in 1895; her parents came from Russia. VIEW PDF +

YANNIS | 5th Grade

 MILLICENT FAWCETT  /  BERNADETTE

My great-grandmother stopped going to school after three years of elementary school because it was prohibited by Belgian colonizers to make long studies. VIEW PDF +

MAUREEN | 5th Grade

 IDA H. HARPER  /  JOSEPHINE

The legal age to start working was 14. She was supposed to be in school, that’s why when the inspector went to the factory, the workers had to hide her in the closet. VIEW PDF +

HELENA | 5th Grade

 LOUISE MICHEL  /  IRACEMA

She wanted to study to become a teacher. Her father did not let her continue her studies, because she was at an age when she was supposed to get married. VIEW PDF +

JEREMY | 5th Grade

 ETHEL MARY SMYTH  /  YVETTE

She absolutely wanted the right to vote. She thought that it was unfair for women not to have the right to vote, so she fought a lot. She didn’t fight violently. VIEW PDF +

MANON | 5th Grade

 MARY ANN MULLER  /  MARIE-MAGDELEINE

After World War II, the provisory French government was in place. The vote was democratic and universal. Women were allowed to vote when the war ended. VIEW PDF +

THEO | 5th Grade

 OLIVE SCHREINER  /  JOSIANE

Josiane was born in 1939, at the beginning of the second world war, in Vésoul, Eastern France, close to the German border. VIEW PDF +

JULIE | 5th Grade

 CARRIE CHAPMAN CATT  /  MARIE-LOUISE

At that time, boys went to work the fields when they were 12 years old while girls did everything in the house except when they were sent as a “housekeeper” in rich families. VIEW PDF +

SOLINE | 5th Grade

 ROSA MANUS  /  YVONNE MARIE

She was a feminist, which means she thought that women were not made to stand there and look good but had a role in society to play. Yvonne died in 2009, so that means she voted for 65 years. VIEW PDF +

SOPHIE | 5th Grade

 MADELEINE PELLETIER  /  FRANZISKA JOHANNA

Franziska did not participate in the fight for women’s right to vote, but it was a man, Oskar Poensgen that opened the discussion of the women’s right to vote in Germany. VIEW PDF +

GIACOMO | 5th Grade

 EMMELINE PANKHURST  /  MARGARET DOROTHEA

Since she was educated and her husband was in publishing, she most certainly voted at the first occasion when Republican Warren G. Harding won over Woodrow Wilson in 1920. VIEW PDF +

IMAN | 5th Grade

 HUBERTINE AUCLERT  /  JEANNE

She was an only child and did not have much fun in her early childhood. When little, Jeanne had no right to speak without being given permission. VIEW PDF +

THOMAS | 5th Grade

 ROSIKA SCHWIMMER  /  EUGÉNIE

The first time my great-grandmother went to vote was in 1946 to elect a vice-president. She took her little girl, my grandmother, along with her to the mayor’s office. VIEW PDF +

SARAH | 5th Grade

 MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT  /  TRUDI

My great grandmother, Trudi, was the first woman to vote in my family in 1971 in Switzerland, more precisely at Untersickentahl in the canton of Argovie. VIEW PDF +

MAXIMILIAN | 5th Grade

 ALETTA JACOBS  /  NATALYA

In Russia, the tsars had absolute power. Women’s role at that time was to work in the fields, cook the food and do many other things. It was the same role for men and children too. VIEW PDF +

OLYMPE | 5th Grade

 FLORA TRISTAN  /  ELIZABETH

Elisabeth finished her schooling when she was 14 years old, when she received her certificate. At that time, women finished school earlier to learn how to be a good housewife. VIEW PDF +

TARA | 5th Grade

 AMELIA BLOOMER  /  MONTAZ

The first woman in my family who could vote was named Momtaz. She was born in 1913, in Racht, Iran. She was born under the Ghajar Dynasty. At that time, women had absolutely no rights. VIEW PDF +

CLAUDIA | 5th Grade

 MARIE POPELIN  /  PEPA

At that time, in Spain, there was a monarchy and only the rich men had the right to vote. The feminist movement began in Barcelone and Madrid at the beginning of the twentieth century. VIEW PDF +

MAYA | 5th Grade

 CHARLOTTE DESPARD  /  JEANNE

She wanted to go to college but unfortunately her family couldn’t pay for tuition. Even her brothers didn’t go to college. Also at that time, there weren’t that many colleges that let in African-Americans. VIEW PDF +