Storytelling Archive: Harold Gretouce

Women Leading the Way



Harold Gretouce

Harold Gretouce

Lycée Français de New York | New York, NY

In 2010, my class had the pleasure of participating in Women Leading the Way under the leadership of Mireille Miller. My students studied the life of early suffragette campaigners from around the world and had the opportunity to research the women in their families who were the first to have the right to vote.

This interdisciplinary work combining research, art and writing was a definite source of enrichment and taught students about the civil rights movement in a meaningful way linking it to their personal family history.

The project resulted in a beautiful exhibition of portraits and biographies in a gallery outside of our school. It was a success and continues today with this presented in the form of an exhibition of a portrait gallery made with three pencils by each student and an accompanying biography of a suffragette. This project was a big success and continues today with the commemoration of the centenary of women's suffrage.

AMIR | 5th Grade

 MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE  /  MAHIN

Her family was not rich but poor and lived in a rural area where women had no voting rights. At the age of sixteen, she was forced by her family to have an arranged wedding with Yahya, a rich war doctor. VIEW PDF +

CORBIN | 5th Grade

 NANCY COOK  /  FAY

At the age of ten, she started to work at a store that sold clothes because her parents could not afford her first apartment, so she needed to start saving money. VIEW PDF +

ALEXANDRA | 5th Grade

 BARBARA BODICHON  /  PAULETTE

My grandfather told me that there was universal suffrage but that not a lot of women fought for this right in Les Landes. VIEW PDF +

CÉLINE | 5th Grade

 SOJOURNER TRUTH  /  MARIE-ELISE

When my grandma was a kid, she was responsible. She took care of her brother, performed housework, studied, and helped her brother with his homework. VIEW PDF +

PHILIPPE | 5th Grade

 LUCY STONE  /  AGUSTINA

Agustina was very good friends with the woman who had begun the movement of women’s rights. Her name was Moreau de Justo. Women won their right to vote in 1947, with the help of men. VIEW PDF +

MIA-SARAH | 5th Grade

 HARRIET TAYLOR MILL  /  NAZIMA

Nazima is my great-great-grandmother on my mother’s side. She was Egyptian. The daughter of Nazima, my great-grandmother was named Renée. I always called her Sito because it means grandmother in Arabic. VIEW PDF +

CATRIONA | 5th Grade

 FRANCES HARPER  /  ELIZA

Eliza was born at the time that Queen Victoria was ruling. For the rich, life was luxurious because of all the servants; for the people in between, there were many opportunities, but for the poor, life was hard. VIEW PDF +

EVARISTE | 5th Grade

 DOROTHY THOMPSON  /  EMILIE

In her family, the boys were treated the same as the girls were treated, and there were no suffragettes in the Tarn –Viane was a small city–. VIEW PDF +

DORA | 5th Grade

 LUCRETIA MOTT  /  SUZANNE

One day, a woman noticed that men were paid more than the women for the same work, then five women noticed it, then ten, and it went on and on till the women started to protest which led them to start the Women’s Rights movement. VIEW PDF +

CIRCE | 5th Grade

 ALICE PAUL  /  LILLIAN MAE

Women fought a lot for the voting rights in South Carolina as well. The government finally decided that the women should have voting rights. My grandmother did not fight for voting rights but she believed that the women were to have this right. VIEW PDF +

ELYSSA | 5th Grade

 CHRYSTAL MACMILLAN  /  MARTHA

In Germany, women were granted the right to vote on November 12, 1918. Martha was 29 years old at the time. The men of the social democratic party supported and defended the women’s fight for the right to vote. VIEW PDF +

ANTONIN | 5th Grade

 OLYMPE DE GOUGES  /  JULIA

When Julia was fifteen, she left (Italy) with her family to America, in a boat. Her dad came to America to realize the American dream. In 1909, Julia married George. Together they built a house in Long Island. VIEW PDF +

NICOLAS | 5th Grade

 SARAH EMILY DAVIES  /  ROSALIE

My grandmother grew up in an environment where women could vote. Although the women were not treated equally in their work place, they could vote. The workforce movement would come later on in her life. VIEW PDF +

SOPHIE | 5th Grade

 HANNAH SHEEHY-SKEFFINGTON  /  DZOVIG

There are few women in my family who have had the opportunity to vote in presidential elections in their countries. My mom is one of those women. Her name is Dzovig. VIEW PDF +

SEVRIN | 5th Grade

 ELSIE INGLIS  /  MARY

Despite her degree from NYU Law School, she never worked as a lawyer. Mary tried to find a job but being Jewish and a woman was an impossible combination in this field back then. VIEW PDF +

JULIAN | 5th Grade

 EMILY MURPHY  /  MÉMÉE AIMÉE

After she got married, Mémée Aimée was the head of the household because she proved superior to her husband, Maurice, an agricultural mechanic. People listened to her, but she did not listen to others. VIEW PDF +

ETIENNE | 5th Grade

 JULIA WARD HOWE  /  EVELYN

The movement for independence and ending slavery was more important than the rights of women because men did not have any rights either!!! VIEW PDF +

GABRIELLA | 5th Grade

 ELLEN KEY  /  ANNA

Anna was too young to be in the fight of the suffragettes because she was only 3 years old, and her mother did not concern herself with the suffragettes. VIEW PDF +

EMILY | 5th Grade

 IDA B WELLS-BARNETT  /  ELISA

When she was small, children were treated like small soldiers. There were no arguments with adults. Adults were very strict with their children. VIEW PDF +

EMILE | 5th Grade

 EMILIE GOURD  /  JEANNE

My great-grandmother, Jeanne, was born in 1899 in Romania from French parents and is the first woman on my father’s side of the family who voted in 1946. VIEW PDF +